Mating Behaviour in Cats

Mating Behaviour in Cats

The mating process is always an extremely noisy occasion. The jug of water poured out of bedroom windows to disperse courting cats is a well-known human response to this. Although cats can see no further in the dark than any other animal, their ability to open their eyes wide enables them to see well enough to move freely at light levels well below human response. Their nocturnal wanderings are dictated by many factors. Mating is of course one of these, but so also is the fact that their prey tend to move about at night and are therefore more easily hunted. Also, because they can see clearly when we find it difficult, the world is likely to be quieter and safer for them at night.

Doctored males are notable voyeurs, a characteristic rarely appreciated by the local torn, and fighting may well take place if prowling torn cats, resentful of the deviant interest shown in their behaviour by the doctored but peeping toms crouched unhealthily on the top of garden walls, are not given clue respect. Fighting might also occur through the natural enmity between neighbouring cats, whether entire or neutered.

Occasionally fights may take place when torn cats make an unscheduled and unwelcome pass at the local queen cat. However, when the queen is calling, her insistent and unflagging message continues until she is mated. The caterwauling torn cat seeking a mate is as nothing compared with the female responding to the powerful and persistent desire to perpetuate her species. This calling phenomenon is characteristic of the cat and is certainly likely to shatter the normal tranquility of the household, particularly if delivered at the high decibel rating of the queen Siamese in full cry. In fact, many owners are finally persuaded to have their female spayed because of the nuisance factor of this regular and repetitive occurrence.